Favorite films

  • Halloween
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends
  • Risky Business
  • The Cranes Are Flying

Recent activity

All
  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★★★★½

  • No Exit

    ★★★½

  • Jagged Edge

    ★★★★

  • Spencer

    ★★★★½

Recent reviews

More
  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★★★★½

    Everything Everywhere All At Once, the second film from the writer-director duo of Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert is bigger in every way that their extraordinary debut Swiss Army Man – more ambitious, more accomplished, more sprawling, more sentimental and more difficult to encapsulate in a single sentence or review. The bare bones: Michelle Yeoh plays Evelyn Quan Wang, a disgruntled laundry owner, in a part that was written specifically for her. The film opens with Evelyn, her husband Waymond…

  • No Exit

    No Exit

    ★★★½

    B-pictures have taken on a new life in the wake of the pandemic, partly because they so often depend on claustrophobically sequestered spaces. To some extent, the digital revolution made those spaces seem redundant, since online life collapses any clear sense of physical boundaries, but lockdown has given audiences (especially American audiences) a new awareness of what it means to be constrained in a single place for a sustained amount of time. Directed by Damien Power, off a screenplay by…

Popular reviews

More
  • The Wolf of Wall Street

    The Wolf of Wall Street

    The Wolf of Wall Street is based on the bestselling memoir by Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), which describes how he became one of the richest people in America through sustained security fraud. One of Belfort’s most prominent strategies was to sell worthless stocks to inexperienced customers – in effect, to sell nothing to nobodies – meaning that it was a career that subsisted less on providing goods than in raising the process of circulation itself to a fever pitch. As…

  • Nightcrawler

    Nightcrawler

    A kind of spiritual sequel to End of Watch, Dan Gilroy’s debut feature stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Louis Bloom, a petty criminal who turns his hand to freelance accident and crime scene photography to satisfy his yearnings to become a member of the professional class. Despite being set in Los Angeles, it’s clearly modelled on Michael Mann’s Thief – there’s the same procedural coldness, the same aversion to natural light, the same gravitation towards lurid, tungsten hues and, above all,…