Bill Layton

Currently too focused on school/college apps to watch/review many movies. When things quiet down I’ll be more active.

Favorite films

  • Burning
  • City of God
  • Three Colors: Red
  • Seven Samurai

Recent activity

All
  • First Reformed

    ★★★★★

  • 12

    ★★★★★

  • Beanpole

    ★★★★★

  • Céline and Julie Go Boating

    ★★★★★

Recent reviews

More
  • First Reformed

    First Reformed

    ★★★★★

    Summer is here, my long and stressful school year is over, and I am finally watching movies again…

    and First Reformed is a simply immaculate work of filmmaking. Paul Schrader is truly one of a kind and Ethan Hawke delivers the performance of a life. Every frame is perfect. Brilliance.

  • Trainspotting

    Trainspotting

    ★★★★★

    Trainspotting is a hell of a film and one of the best cinematic depictions of addiction I have seen. It immerses you in the Edinburgh drug scene and the roller coaster lives of the addicts caught up in it, but it does not moralize as films like Traffic do. It tells a story and it tells it well. It brings you in, it takes you through the highs and lows, and it leaves you captivated, disgusted, laughing, crying, and a million other things. Also, perhaps it’s a bit off-topic, but I’d kill to have a Scottish accent.

Popular reviews

More
  • Paris, Texas

    Paris, Texas

    ★★★★★

    Paris, Texas is a story both extremely personal and a story that is endlessly vast; a story both of Travis Henderson and of America itself. Travis is a man, devastated by his past, who yearns to emotionally connect with those he still loves yet doesn’t know how. Unable to be a husband and a father, Travis fled his past life years ago and now traverses the Texas desert like a guardian of the frontier. He is able to rekindle his…

  • Picnic at Hanging Rock

    Picnic at Hanging Rock

    ★★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Picnic at Hanging Rock is a film that provides more of an experience than a story. Strikingly beautiful, haunting, and utterly confounding, Weir seeks to provoke the audiences mind, not to provide simple answers. Weir’s approach makes Picnic at Hanging Rock a film almost impossible to describe or characterize. One can mention its themes of sexual repression, sexual awakening, and the exploration of the vast unknown, but you simply would have to watch the movie to understand just how these themes are…