The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

It’s pretty easy to dismiss director Wes Anderson’s work as window dressing or dollhouses with lots of intricacy but not much depth. But that would be misreading a lot of his work.

A lot of his best recent work — Moonrise Kingdom, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Grand Budapest Hotel and his latest, The French Dispatch — are all attuned to a melancholic nostalgia for a rose-colored past. Whether that’s a fair assessment of time or not, these films feel reflective of a specific time for specific people rather than a wide-ranging view of the period for most people.

The same can be said about the response to Anderson’s films. Especially with The French Dispatch, the director has pivoted into a love it or hate it period of his career. The end product of Dispatch feels meticulously coordinated to Anderson’s sensibilities, almost becoming a parody of his own career. But at the same time, this effect feels arcane in a medium that’s theatrical output has favored a ubiquitous visual palette rather than individuality.

READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE: www.cinematary.com/writing/the-french-dispatch-movie-review-wes-anderson