• Robinson Crusoe on Mars

    Robinson Crusoe on Mars

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    This movie’s visual effects and gorgeously illustrated backdrops almost made me forget about its several groan-inducing plot points (Egyptian alien slave miners?). And as a 1960s sci-fi film, the comically dissonant space logic gets a pass, I guess.

  • Taste of Cherry

    Taste of Cherry

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    This movie began in slow, deliberate Kiarostami fashion, but quickly took me in.

    Taste of Cherry is about inevitable and complementary forces. The gravity that aids Mr. Badii’s first passenger in fleeing down a hillside and later stops his car in its tracks is as natural and impeding as the religious beliefs that deter his passengers from agreeing to help him commit suicide. There’s a comedic cruelty in the way that Mr. Badii witnesses these natural forces at play, specifically…

  • Funeral Parade of Roses

    Funeral Parade of Roses

    ★★★★★

    Stunning monochrome, hypnotic multi-media editing, queer inversion of the Oedipal complex as nightmarish plot line...This movie has the feel of being draped in barbed lace and it’s the best thing I’ve ever seen.

  • Clean, Shaven

    Clean, Shaven

    ★★★½

    A list sold this movie as “feel good” to me but it actually made me want to curl up into a tight ball and roll off the edge of a cliff.

  • Frownland

    Frownland

    ★★★

    I feel philosophically unwell after suffering through the entirety of this movie. Gonna go take a hot shower.

  • Joker

    Joker

    ★½

    I used to think my life was a tragedy
    .
    .
    but now I realize it’s a fucking comedy

  • Fantastic Planet

    Fantastic Planet

    ★★★★★

    What an adorable lesson in compassion

  • Big Trouble in Little China

    Big Trouble in Little China

    ★★★★★

    Kurt Russell cast as chief doofus= my favorite cinematic male archetype of all time

  • The Turin Horse

    The Turin Horse

    ★★★★★

    Bela Tarr's long shots force you to confront your own disposition, but more specifically, your ability to sit comfortably with yourself in the face of utter dejection. And I love that.