Daniel Jensen

Daniel Jensen Patron

Favorite films

  • The Lady Eve
  • Basic Instinct
  • Double Indemnity
  • The Last Seduction

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  • Jennifer's Body

    ★★★★½

  • Eve of Destruction

    ★½

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

    ★★★½

  • The Hills Have Eyes Part 2

    ★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Jennifer's Body

    Jennifer's Body

    ★★★★½

    Feels like looking at an knife at an antique store, one that is underpriced because it has been beaten to shit and dulled (by a studio, for example), but there’s still a glint to the steel that indicates it was murderously sharp at one point, able to disembowel with a stroke.

    Or maybe I’m wrong, and Jennifer’s Body was always soft around the edges[1]. The framing device is mostly[2] useless (and retrospectively makes no sense[3]), and every time the movie…

  • Eve of Destruction

    Eve of Destruction

    ★½

    If AI ever truly catches on as a screenwriting solution, I have no doubt this will be incorrectly considered an early example by some students with a loose grasp on chronology. Instead, the more widely read will intuit it was composed during a Robert McKee STORY seminar, or at least you will be extremely hard-pressed to convince me otherwise.

    Which is to say that no amount of skill or resources could turn this basic of a story into anything excellent,…

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  • Murder on the Orient Express

    Murder on the Orient Express

    ★★★

    Over the last few of decades of film, it has often been the case that a director will take a person with whom he is in love and create a movie that is a cinematic monument to how beautiful that person was at that time.

    Examples include Woody Allen creating Annie Hall for Diane Keaton, Luc Besson creating The Messenger for Milla Jovovich, and Quentin Tarantino making the Kill Bill movies with Uma Thurman.

    But not a single one of…

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

    ★★★½

    Still cogitating on the abortion metaphor, here, regarding how obvious it is in retrospect, and how on Earth I could have missed it in the first place.

    What felt impossibly romantic to me 20 years ago ("Okay." "Okay.") now feels like a small-t tragedy with people stuck in permanent ruts as to what and who they like; it's easy to classify it as an allegory about the tyranny of the familiar (as in recognition patterns) if one chooses. There is…