Dan Mckay

Overly enthusiastic about most things and slightly insecure about the amount of films I haven't seen.

Favorite films

  • The Graduate
  • A Matter of Life and Death
  • Blue Velvet
  • Dogtooth

Recent activity

All
  • The Lady and the Duke

  • Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon

    ★★★★

  • Yi Yi

    ★★★★★

  • Imitation of Life

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • The Lady and the Duke

    The Lady and the Duke

    The intentionally flat film of a fascist miser intent upon platforming cynicism.

  • Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon

    Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon

    ★★★★

    "Like a bomb exploding in reverse... Thoughts, ideas... fragments of images. Shards of memory, like shrapnel... All come back to me, and are forced back out in a cruel pastiche of experience."

    A portrait of the artist in bold, unforgiving strokes.

    Perhaps predictablely rejected by Bacon's estate, this film probes the dichotomous relationship between the artist (played surperbly by Derek Jacobi) and his lover/muse George Dyer (a markedly vulnerable Daniel Craig). Tender yet barbaric, traumatised yet inspired, the lens shifts…

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  • Midsommar

    Midsommar

    ★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    "Dude. You have got to get off the fence with this."

    Another aesthetically impressive yet highly frustrating film from one of the most intriguing filmmakers of the last decade.

    Generally, Ari Aster's Midsommar (I watched the director’s cut and didn’t get a chance to see the theatrical release) is an improvement upon its chaotic predecessor, Hereditary, yet similarly lacks the overarching tonal cohesion and existential shock-factor promised in its exposition. In many ways, Midsommar is a likely follow-up. As with…

  • Yi Yi

    Yi Yi

    ★★★★★

    I was admittedly quite sceptical of this lethargic, three-hour musing into the ordinary lives of countless members of a middle-class family in Taipei, Taiwan. I spent a headache-ridden half-hour straining to adjust to the complexity of Yang’s immaculately detailed world until a while later, when I realised that this was almost unnecessary. Through comedy, tragedy, horror and romance, the diversity of the every-day is expressed – a complex reality that can be felt, observed, yet never fully intellectualised. In Yi…