Favorite films

  • The Lost Weekend
  • True Lies
  • Sunset Boulevard
  • Scream

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  • Don't Worry Darling

    ★★★

  • Tony Hawk: Until the Wheels Fall Off

    ★★★

  • All Quiet on the Western Front

    ★★★

  • The Spirit of St. Louis

    ★★★

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  • Seven Samurai

    Seven Samurai

    ★★★★

    As of before watching this, I had seen three Akira Kurosawa films, which I sort of enjoyed, but which to me weren't indicative of one of the greatest directors of all time. However, lately I've found films of other great directors I didn't appreciate earlier that I've fallen in love with, so the enthusiasm to not give up on Kurosawa yet rekindled. I figured it was about time I didn't just try my hand again at one of his shorter…

  • Seven Years in Tibet

    Seven Years in Tibet

    ★★★

    1989 saw revolutionary waves that resulted in the end of communist rule in Central and Eastern Europe, the Cold War, and the existence of the Iron Curtain between Eastern and Western Europe; a.k.a. the Fall of Communism. 1989 also saw the 14th Dalai Lama, the highest spiritual, and back then also political, leader of Tibet, win the Nobel Peace Prize. Two events that precipitated renewed, growing Western interest in the cultural-political plight of Tibet, which eight years later culminated in…

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  • Don't Worry Darling

    Don't Worry Darling

    ★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    100-word review: Florence Pugh and cults, it's already becoming a thing! I was on board with the twist initially when I still thought Alice was being drugged/brainwashed to think she's living in the 50s, while actually just being secluded from modern-day society (à la The Village); less so when it turned out Don’t Worry Darling is conceptually more like The Matrix instead! First half lingers too much, and doesn't quite manage to make the feminist point it's trying to, and which I was highly anticipating. P&P (Pugh and Pine) steal the show way more than Styles, to no-one's surprise probably.

  • Tony Hawk: Until the Wheels Fall Off

    Tony Hawk: Until the Wheels Fall Off

    ★★★

    100-word review: Give Rodney Mullen his own high-production documentary already! Until the Wheels Fall Off taught me lots about the doc's titular subject — how his mind works — but would've benefitted from a greater focus on the sport of skateboarding as a whole too, which would've helped me understand why, for example, his peers called Tony's tricks "lame" — as a layman, I can't see how they are. From a bit of internet research I found out that Hawk isn't widely considered the GOAT by insiders, but it's quite spectacular watching a piece of media that makes it feel like you're watching a GOAT.

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  • All Quiet on the Western Front

    All Quiet on the Western Front

    ★★★

    100-word review: This third and latest adaptation of Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front reminds me of 1917 (well duh), because both are excellent examples of how war films feature some of the best cinematography (people love to capture utter destruction and brutality beautifully), as well as Come and See (again, duh), because both are excellent examples of how I personally don't necessarily connect with a character on an emotional level simply because they endure one horror after another. An accomplished reiteration of the intended anti-war message for sure, but hopefully the 1930 'original' manages to move me more.

  • The Piano

    The Piano

    ★★

    100-word review: Mute pianist Ada has been married off to New Zealand landowner Alisdair. After Alisdair trades Ada’s piano for a stretch of land with the Maori-friendly Baines, she begins to ‘buy’ it back from Baines through ‘piano lessons’ (intimacy). Almost unimaginable this was directed by a woman, because Ada’s change of faith towards her abuser — icky in how offensively little it was questioned. Don’t think it would’ve been received well if it had a male director, and for…