Akitsu Springs

Akitsu Springs

That fateful day of the calamitous summer of '45 lingers like a hideous nightmare not only in collective memory of a nation, but also as an intimate trauma of the individuals who lived through it: a day when the Japanese halted and cried out of desperation, knowing that their country stood in ruin, never again to be as it was before. The love of Shinko and Kawamoto, obsolete before it had begun, becomes thus a memory of a lost world, revived over and over again in a series of reunions and farewells, a symphonic stream of dramatic highlights tempered to Hayashi's irrepressible, romantic theme.

What was reborn under the blossoms of spring is to be obscurred by the darkness of yet another winter. The cycle repeats, from darkness to light: the light of love resurrected; and back to darkness again: the darkness of the temporal ellipses between the movements of Yoshida's sonata, the ellipses which quickly start swallowing first years, then decades, until, in the the end, Kawamoto leaves his lover, knowing that a man can look back only so many times. When the future tramples the maladapted, one can only march to the uncertainty of tomorrow and leave the past to wither away – haunted by the memory of those who were left behind.

Block or Report