• Mulan

    Mulan

    ★★

    Never grasp what kind of purpose all the Disney remakes are serving unless solely to grab more money, including with this one. In the live-action version, Mulan is agonizingly serious and humorless as it's focusing more on the martial art and battle aspects. All of that is enchanting spectacles, but the warrior theme for loyal, brave, and true can't accommodate enough space for character development. At the expense, all the critical moments are comprised poorly with devoid of emotion.

  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    ★★★

    I'm thinking of ending things like trying too hard to be included in the realm of Kaufmanesque which never has the intention to put the viewers in the same logic to understand what on earth is going on.

    If you're looking for a mystery to solve or a riddle to break, don't push until you bend over backward just to connect all the haphazard dots in this movie. Just drop a hint: even the dreamlike logic cannot inherently fit to…

  • Shirley

    Shirley

    ★★★½

    A ferocious Shirley Jackson is the unreliable story-teller who is a specialist in drawing you close on her disorienting phantasm with tricky narration and gripping you to a dauntingly immersive experience. The visual style integrated with ominous score is obviously a distinct fingerprint that illuminates the horror in the imprisonment of two housewives. It's more than a tale that comprises feminine hysteria but also brings the feminist spirit within.

  • The Conversation

    The Conversation

    ★★★

    The professional wiretapper is in a trial that questions the moral and responsibility of his profession. The mystery unravels slowly, but the threat keeps entailing in a piece of wire. From the elegiac tone of character study type of film, we can see how the terror of surveillance technology blurred the lines of privacy since it first invented. Even for Harry Caul as the outsider, intruding someone else's matter would cost a great expense of paranoia to his internal struggle. Sneaking is necessarily a consequential action.

  • Videodrome

    Videodrome

    ★★★

    The idea that virtual media can regain an authoritative power to manipulate our brains never become too relevant until today. Hallucination as the product of overconsuming behaviour might be read as a pretentious remark in the early show business era in the 80's, but according to the current short-term attention and lacking focus crisis - due to the exploiting engagement opting in social media logic - that fabricated reality possibly already exists in beetween the deep and narrow path of our minds.

  • Jacob's Ladder

    Jacob's Ladder

    ★★½

    This movie caught us on the verge of paranoia, hallucination, and reality. The puzzling pieces story bewildered us with terrifying nightmares and alluring scorn about the government's maddening scheme of devouring the nation in the thirst for war. Conversely, its intention actually never participated in a play fair from the start. The pieces necessarily never fit in a coherent arrangement, the puzzle forever seizes us in the arbitrary closure. Although, the idea of being trapped is suitable for the psychic trauma theme.

  • Les Misérables

    Les Misérables

    ★★★★

    A crime story pulsates in the heart of an immigrant residence in Paris suburbs circa the celebration of the World Cup. In the use of documentary-style, overhead drone shots, and fish out of the water premise, Ladj Ly composes a gritty and comprehensive portrayal of violence structure in the marginalized neighborhood. It starts telling from tough and authorized control by the police, a wrecking riot with a gypsy gang, until a hostile negotiation with a religious ex-con leader. Even though…

  • Normal People

    Normal People

    ★★★★

    Over the course the central love story expanded, the show has transformed all the cliche anecdotes of a romantic trope as essential subject matters. It intrudes on the notion that the classic young love narrative remains relevant and needs to be included in the liberation concept of the modern love story.

    Read the full review here: medium.com/story-enthusiast/the-transformative-young-love-entanglement-in-normal-people-bfd6a217d235

  • Tigertail

    Tigertail

    ★★★

    Pin Jui's immigrant story is a poignant realization of the sacrifice made by our parent's generation. The recital of the lost love from the perspective of a stoic and apathetic 60's-years-old Pin Jui ( terrifically played by Tzi Ma) would convince you that the romantic illusion of the one-that-got-away does exist.

    Still the viewer can garner loads of fondness despite the absence of the levity-considering it comes from Master of None's lead creator. Otherwise that the movie can gain plenty…

  • House of Hummingbird

    House of Hummingbird

    ★★★

    This film may successfully portray the 90's era of South Korea in a precise manner, but the viewer might never have a close experience of someone else's life before, like when they're getting into some of the transitory chapters of Eunhee's adolescent life.

    With the tender vignette visuals, all the minutiae of a 14-years-old girl's life are collected in the form of a pocket memory that utterly warm your heart with ease. But, how this film chooses to tell its…

  • Phantom Thread

    Phantom Thread

    ★★½

    Another Paul Thomas Anderson's film with a mercurial and toxic genius as the main character. The recycling trope is a bit insufferable at this point.

    The thespian Daniel Day Lewis does enough inhibiting that role with his stern and rigid charm. His demanding is also enough to conquer his love interest to blindly concede to him, although he treats her like one of the mannequins being forced to display the dress he tailored.

    Initially, she appears with naivette but later…

  • Honey Boy

    Honey Boy

    ★★½

    In five minutes the movie starts, it's easy to apprehend the story will later progress into a deeply personal film. The three main actors collectively deliver the concrete and emotional performance in the specific and precise amount of intensity. Even though, LaBeouf's emulation of his own father in some places feels a bit too cartoonish, imitative, and also gimmicky - blame the shaggy artificial-wig.

    The candid and elaborate style does make the story so compelling to watch. On the other hand, it subsequently holds the immense bleakness that could leave you dissatisfied when it comes to the finish line.