Suspiria

Suspiria ★★★★★

Forgot how absolutely BATSHIT this thing is, and I will never not love, and respect it, for that. Very few films go for it as hard as Suspiria does (honestly, this works in regards to the original as well), and to me, that holds a lot of currency in our remake/franchise driven industry. I remembered two scenes carrying the brunt of the horrific/crazy weight (yes, the two you are thinking of), but was pleasantly caught off guard by how consistently scary this thing is. It's atmosphere IS oppressive, and it feels like it's cramming uncomfortable detail, after uncomfortable detail, down your throat; it's an onslaught of epic proportions. It's mostly derived from it's insanely energetic energy (I know it has a slow pace, but I think it's high-wired inside that), and the inclusion of horrifying images, but that counts for a lot. Guadagnino does the most directing I've seen in a long time, and I personally believe it pays off in spades. I totally get how this doesn't work for people, or being put off by trying to interpose high-art political allegories (which was less rewarding this time around (though, still a great aspect nonetheless (ending worked better for me because it felt less forced))), but I found so much to revel inside of on the surface level pleasantries of the muscular film-making on display. Never has so much been communicated through glances, grunts, and glorious cutting on display. It's backed up by very dialed in performances (Tilda is just as great as I remembered, but Dakota disappointed (my lady friend didn't know for the whole film that Klemperer was played by Swinton, and just thought it was some old man, thus proving [definitively for me] this was an incredible performance/decision), and a desire to inspire awe. Thom York's score is the most, "oddly mismatched thing that somehow works", that I've probably ever witnessed in a movie.

This is still probably the gold standard for remakes, mostly in the sense of it took the original and completely flipped it inside out; becoming it's own thing, whilst being basically the same. Still unsure (in a weird way), which I like more, but both are among my all-time favorites, without any hesitation. I really should see all of Guadagnino's work, because he is one of the strongest showings of going two for two.

To forge onward, you cannot force progress, but slowly take over, and change within the bounds already set, while inputting new ideas. Then that cycle will continue forever, until actual balance is achieved, or, everything is destroyed. You cannot run from a horrifying past, or present, and instead, must learn from the past, face the present head on, and consider the path to the future; only then, will things maybe, actually, change. Kill your idols, bestow forgiveness, destroy unquestionable evil, and long live the true mother.

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