hejops

would rather see macDonald's, than macbeth

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  • Tekkonkinkreet

    Tekkonkinkreet

    ★★

    Given Tekkonkinkreet's unconventional art style and penchant for hyperkinetic action, I was genuinely under the impression that Masaaki Yuasa had inexplicably decided to work under a quirky English pseudonym. Then I realised that any bravura the film might have promised had - unlike the consistently bonkers Mind Game - all but evaporated after the first ten minutes, as the flashy visuals are revealed to be in service of facile, contrived attempts at extolling brotherhood and critiquing urbanisation. Disappointing.

  • The Abyss

    The Abyss

    ★★★½

    Two highly competent and professional crews are sent to the barren depths of hell, and are forced to grapple with a multitude of fears - the hostile environment, the military presence of the Soviets, and the great unknowns of the deep - until it becomes clear that the paranoia between them is the real enemy. An exemplary blockbuster that with incredible atmosphere, set-pieces and performances across the board, more than making up for Cameron's underwhelming Aliens. The extended release benefits…

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  • Stalker

    Stalker

    ★★★★★

    What is it that we fear most? Hardship and oppression; the immediate terror that lurks in the shadows of a desolate, colorless world? The unknown; disembodied voices, impossible geographies, and the Zone's unwavering gaze? In Stalker, Tarkovsky posits that perhaps the greatest fear of all is the fear of the self, and the inability to fully comprehend one's own nature. Perhaps the climactic rejection of desire should not be seen as an act of cowardice or fatalistic indecision, but of…

  • A Scene at the Sea

    A Scene at the Sea

    ★★★★★

    Possibly the most poignant expression of humility and joy I've ever witnessed. If the greatest films are those whose self-effacing beauty (in both form and message) inspires genuine reflection and personal betterment, then A Scene at the Sea must surely rank among them. Finding one's own source of unsullied happiness and becoming one with it - perhaps that is what it means to truly live.