Tenet

Tenet ★★★★

Rating: 3/4.

Tenet requires a level of focus that no other film needs. And when you think you’re understanding it, Nolan will load a bunch more on you, but this time with Ludwig Göransson’s score blasting over the dialogue. You can’t get lost or you won’t be able to catch up. Keep up and you’ll be fine.
The film is a puzzle. Any other film would just involve watching a scene and understanding the plot and characters, and the movie will take you from there. Some movies may require more thought, whether into characters, themes, or (like most of Nolan’s films) complex concepts. But, Tenet requires you to be assembling this giant, elaborate puzzle in your head, simultaneous to understanding the scenes taking place. But, thankfully, Tenet keeps its characters and themes relatively simple—a bit of weight off your shoulders.
The action sequences and set-pieces are stunning as always, and Tenet manages to bend your mind more than Nolan’s previous films. The inverting of time is where the added awe-factor comes in. The film is at it best when it can stun and wow you, and make you come to an epiphany of what is happening, fitting a puzzle piece into place. But, as all the big pieces assemble in your head, there isn’t much left to truly blow your mind.
It’s truly a film unlike any other. It’s Nolan’s master class in puzzle cinema.