Favorite films

  • The Long Goodbye
  • Do the Right Thing
  • Taxi Driver
  • Disco Godfather

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  • X

    ★★★★

  • Out of Sight

    ★★★★★

  • Woodstock

    ★★★★★

  • Brewster's Millions

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Alone Together

    Alone Together

    The basic set-up is a reverse “Goodbye Girl,” with the backdrop of a global pandemic. The trouble is, Holmes is not exactly Neil Simon. June and Charlie dilly-dally around the house, shy and bored; their boredom is contagious, and their small talk isn’t exactly riveting. The dialogue is downright dire, all flat exchanges of information and banal insight and inconsequential chit-chat (“I can’t remember the last time I slept that long.” “Well, you must’ve needed it!”) – at one point early on, swear to God, they ask each other their favorite books. Their favorite books!

    READ MORE: theplaylist.net/alone-together-review-katie-holmes-pandemic-romance-is-a-bland-banal-bore-tribeca-20220615/

  • American Dreamer

    American Dreamer

    ★★½

    “American Dreamer” is a mess of a movie, in which scenes of startling wit and emotional truth co-exist alongside entire subplots that are utterly inexplicable. It’s all over the damn place; its good ideas in near equal proportion to its bad ones, feeling less like a polished production than a filmed first draft, released as a rough assembly. As with most rough assemblies, there are gems buried in them. It’s a shame no one dug them out.

    READ MORE: theplaylist.net/american-dreamer-review-peter-dinklage-20220612/

Popular reviews

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  • Top Gun: Maverick

    Top Gun: Maverick

    ★★★★

    Wait, this one’s actually pretty good, what the fuck

  • Don't Look Up

    Don't Look Up

    “Don’t Look Up” fails miserably as satire because satire requires some degree of comic exaggeration and ironic incongruity. However, the response to the existential threat of COVID was impossible to satirize because no fiction could be more ghastly and ridiculous than our reality. And everyone in McKay’s film acts exactly as we expect them to, from the second they appear onscreen, so every single target is hit in the most obvious, broad, predictable manner possible. It doesn’t have anything meaningful to say about the human condition because there aren’t any humans in it – just caricatures.

    FULL REVIEW: theplaylist.net/dont-look-up-review-a-smug-glib-miscalculation-from-adam-mckay-20211207/