Jeremy Lee Cudd

Jeremy Lee Cudd

5* = masterpiece love
4* = true greatness
3* = solid/tangible vision
2* = problematic/half-baked
1* = frustrating/tedious/bs

Favorite films

Don’t forget to select your favorite films!

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Education

    Education

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    The linger on the "processing" in the bathtub is rhythmically perfect. There is a tension in the limbo between the "womb" he seeks and just drowning. Hearing the door jolts Kingsley back to the unfurling hell of his new life. Mom unloads on him out of exhaustion. She doesn't even notice this is his darkest hour. The bottomless crying in bed as his mom exclaims down the hall what a bother he is. What an emotionally vivid nightmare! To know…

  • What Killed Michael Brown?

    What Killed Michael Brown?

    ★★★

    The film is an effective recalibration on many fronts. It features an array of voices that live and labor far from the interests of mainstream news narratives. 

    A compelling case is made that much of the progressive agenda on race is the most insidious present-day expression of white supremacy. The stripping of agency, decimation of organic community structures, and power-narratives that eclipse the actual community needs are the net effect of a self-righteous, bad faith approach to critical policy changes.…

Popular reviews

More
  • What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael

    What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael

    ★★½

    God bless Pauline Kael for letting herself be fully known. The results were mixed and complicated, but our lives on the whole would be so much poorer without her unique and assertive voice. Her case for the subjective response in criticism is so compelling. 

    Given all that, why the fuck would you choose Sarah Jessica Parker to voice Pauline?! 

    A mostly competent doc on a tremendous subject.

  • Vera Drake

    Vera Drake

    ★★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    The collective trauma share at the first dinner party lands so heavy, but also frames an understanding of the tremendous capacity for gratitude for the modest gifts of a "normal" life postwar. 

    By the proposal/engagement sequence, the film has tuned you to the often too small hopes they have for their lives. When the yes and celebration comes, its blooms deep and wide.

    The details in the class attitudes and the utter divide in experiences illuminates the letter of the…