Everything Everywhere All at Once

Everything Everywhere All at Once ★★★★★

In the crazy cosmic gumbo of life, it can often feel so easy to be pulled in by the allure of despair. In our day to day we spend so much time worrying about what we have, what we don't have, and what we could be. I think it's always important to ground yourself in your current reality and focus on what you have amongst the absurdity, and Everything Everywhere All at Once provides a fantastic film that allows you to ruminate on this existential absurdity.

Through its maximalist approach to the multiverse narrative that's so in vogue right now, the film is a thematic and stylistic achievement. The story sets a fantastical sense of melancholy that brought me right back to the first time I watched Eternal Sunshine; it's that unmoored sense of emotional melancholy that makes you feel validated in your anxiety, and is completely universal in its emotional impact. The completely over-the-top presentation is perfectly suited to this kind of story, and I wouldn't have it any other way. The multiverse is full of unexpected, unhinged, and bizarre things that mirror the sense of absurdity we find in our own lives. Things rarely make sense, and while they aren't as off-kilter as a universe where people have hot dogs for fingers, life can sometimes feel just as uncanny.

The narrative here tells us that it is okay to embrace this absurdity, and reminds us that we are not alone in this universal Jambalaya. It also weaves this beautiful story about parental relationships and expectations, lifelong regret, and comes out the other side embracing the messiness of these feelings with open arms whilst portraying a beautiful story of soulmates spanning infinite possibilities. Across unlimited space and time, permutations of permutations, the film still comes down hard on the side of optimism and love which is simply beautiful in its telling.

Throughout all of this chaos we're anchored by an absolutely sublime performance by Michelle Yeoh. In her performance she's able to encompass so much of the human experience, in a pitch-perfect role that lets her be funny, emotional, bad-ass, and wholly human as a character. Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, In the crazy cosmic gumbo of life, it can often feel so easy to be pulled in by the allure of despair. In our day to day we spend so much time worrying about what we have, what we don't have, and what we could be. I think it's always important to ground yourself in your current reality and focus on what you have amongst the absurdity, and Everything Everywhere All at Once provides a fantastic film that allows you to ruminate on this existential absurdity.

Through its maximalist approach to the multiverse narrative that's so in vogue right now, the film is a thematic and stylistic achievement. The story sets a fantastical sense of melancholy that brough me right back to the first time I watched Eternal Sunshine; it's that unmoored sense of emotional melancholy that makes you feel validated in your anxiety, and is completely universal in its emotional impact. The completely over-the-top presentation is perfectly suited to this kind of story, and I wouldn't have it any other way. The multiverse is full of unexpected, unhinged, and bizarre things that mirror the sense of absurdity we find in our own lives. Things rarely make sense, and while they aren't as off-kilter as a universe where people have hot dogs for fingers, life can sometimes feel just as uncanny.

The narrative here tells us that it is okay to embrace this absurdity, and reminds us that we are not alone in this universal Jambalaya. It also weaves this beautiful story about parental relationships and expectations, lifelong regret, and comes out the other side embracing the messiness of these feelings with open arms whilst portraying a beautiful story of soulmates spanning infinite possibilities. Across unlimited space and time, permutations of permutations, the film still comes down hard on the side of optimism and love which is simply beautiful in its telling.

Throughout all of this chaos we're anchored by an absolutely sublime performance by Michelle Yeoh. In her performance she's able to encompass so much of the human experience, in a pitch-perfect role that lets her be funny, emotional, bad-ass, and wholly human as a character. Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, Jamie Lee Curtis, and the immortal James Hong also come to the table with sensational performances that appear to leave their egos at the door in favour of fantastic roles that let them showcase so much of their talents. It's a genuinely great ensemble that all go into this story with everything they've got.

Overall, I'm just so happy to have watched this. It uses its kitchen sink approach to film-making to tell a story that's totally universal, whilst also completely specific to its character experiences. I love when films can do the big and the small with equal success, and Everything Everywhere All at Once does so spectacularly. Loved it.

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