Dawson Joyce

Dawson Joyce

Just your average white cis het American fat boy. He/Him. 20.

Favorite films

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Freaked

    Freaked

    ★★★★

    HOOPTOBER 2020
    4 Body Horror Films – #2

    One of the weirdest, most hilarious, cocaine-fueled comedies to come out of the 1990's, Freaked has clearly been chopped to the bone (what else can explain its runtime being around seventy-five minutes without credits?) but its committed performances, inventive character designs, superb practical and make-up effects, gut-bustingly bizarre humor, and striking originality make it one hell of a freaky good time.

  • Altered States

    Altered States

    ★★★★★

    HOOPTOBER 2020
    4 Body Horror Films – #1

    Home to a transcendent debut performance from cinematic titan William Hurt, Altered States is a brilliantly performed, confidently directed, visually stimulating, nightmare-inducing exploration of the limitless potential lying deep within the human psyche featuring some of the most uncomfortably disturbing and beautifully trippy sequences in both science-fiction and horror history.

Popular reviews

More
  • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

    ★½

    With its intense and exciting action sequences, excellent performances (with the exception of a laughable turn from Jesse Eisenberg), and dazzling visual spectacle being let down by an overstuffed and incoherent script that's filled to the brim with poorly written characters and needlessly convoluted plotting, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice tries to be another Batman reboot, a Man of Steel sequel, and a Justice League set-up all at once with results that are nothing short of depressing to watch.…

  • Arrival

    Arrival

    ★★★★★

    Yet another terrific entry in director Denis Villeneuve's filmography, Arrival is one of the most intelligent, visually stunning, and thought-provoking science fiction films in recent memory, led by a career-best performance from Amy Adams and a pensive, poignant screenplay by Eric Heisserer.