julianblair

julianblair

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Favorite films

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  • His House

    ★★★½

  • Rabbits

    ★★★★

  • Lifeforce

    ★★★

  • She Killed in Ecstasy

    ★★★

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  • His House

    His House

    ★★★½

    boxd.it/dgzEq
    Hooptober Ocho

    Though this has many chilling and effective moments, the greater impact to me, was from being able to see the things that immigrants undergo when they arrive in a country where they are not truly wanted.

    As others have observed, this film could have been made without the supernatural elements and still made an impact. Having said that, the spectres and spirits were very unsettling....made all the more potent by the fine acting of Sope Dirusu as…

  • Rabbits

    Rabbits

    ★★★★

    boxd.it/dgzEq
    Hooptober Ocho - David Lynch at bat

    Rabbits is a unique experience, sort of an experimental film, that probably needs to be gauged by its emotional impact rather than applying a rational interpretation to it. But it's fun to try that anyway.

    There are images, concepts, language and other things that are familiar to us. A living room, an (anthropomorphic animal) family, words spoken, and a rather oppressive droning aural wall of music in the background. Then, there's a…

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  • Lifeforce

    Lifeforce

    ★★★

    Hooptober 8.0
    Tobe Hooper film....since it's HOOPTOBER!

    This was an ambitious film and though it fell short of its reach, was still an interesting story, if watched in an indulgent mood.

    Though it is fair to expect colorful exploitation garbage from the Golan-Globus outfit, this one seemed to have some verve. Based on a literary source, The Space Vampires (a better title), this alien/vampire invasion flick had a lot of fun moments.

    I originally saw it on a panned and…

  • The Blood on Satan's Claw

    The Blood on Satan's Claw

    ★★★½

    boxd.it/dgzEq
    Hooptober Ocho - Folk Horror

    This should probably be considered an early classic of British Folk Horror, as it is sandwiched between Witchfinder General (1968) and The Wicker Man (1973). It was the first such film I ever saw, and believe me, it made an impression!

    The opening scene, of a ploughman discovering a horrid, unearthly skeleton head in the fields, has remained with me for fifty years. The Satanic Infection and Panic that ensues in this rural, 1700s…