The Social Network

"Good luck with your...video game."

I've only seen The Social Network once before, and it was at the time it first came out, when I was about 9 or 10. Understandably, I couldn't remember a single second of it, and therefore needed to rewatch it. I had always put off rewatching it because I have never really liked Facebook as a site, so a film about it seemed like it would be a little uninteresting to me, yet I still knew one of my favourite directors and one of my favourite writers were behind the camera, on top of fantastic reviews, so I certainly wasn't dreading it or anything...but WOW! This was one hell of a pleasant surprise! I was not expecting such a satirical approach to it all.

The movie is unbelievably well crafted and managed to gain my full attention throughout the 120 minute run-time. The directing from the amazing David Fincher is sensational, and the writing from Aaron Sorkin is truly some of the best writing I've ever seen, with the film actually teaching me that dialogue is my favourite aspect to a movie. I just can't put the quality of the screenplay into words (unlike Sorkin) and it obviously deserved the Oscar. The cast is also just perfect. I think I will call David Fincher the king of casting from now on, as his films seem to be casted to utter perfection, and this one included. Jesse Eisenberg is amazing as Mark Zuckerberg with his sharp delivery, dry humour and his uncanny ability to transform his character in an insanely subtle and gradual way. Armie Hammer is very good and is cleverly accompanied with terrific CGI (of course the CGI is good. It's Fincher!) and Justin Timberlake was such a great choice for a manipulative douchebag. Andrew Garfield seems to be in everything I am watching recently and this is also one of his best performances, playing a character that I felt large amounts of sympathy towards (diluted down to 0.03%!!!). In fact, this film is so engaging that I was really sucked in! I've honestly barely ever felt this into a movie before and I really did forget I was watching actors almost immediately, after that mindblowing opening scene. I just saw them as the characters they were playing and speaking of which, my opinion is that Eduardo (Andrew Garfield) and Erica (Rooney Mara) are the only humans in the movie; the rest are just so obsessed with money and business that emotion is genuinely lacking, and what surprised me the most is that Fincher thought this too and actually mocks Mark Zuckerberg and the idea of Facebook.
I love you David Fincher! You know how to make a biopic.

You could actually see the film's portrayal of Zuckerberg as a personification of Facebook itself...as the creation of that devilish site ironically removed intimacy from frienships, despite its popularity/connectivity (just like Mark).
A man who didn't have any friends, because he didn't want any (and also because he was an "asshole"), decided to create a website that prevented loneliness, or in fact increased it.

lucan liked these reviews

All