Frances Ha

Frances Ha

Positively Rohmerian in the way it suggests interior conflict through exterior posturing, seeming to come from a place of both genuine experience and affection, the gorgeously executed dance sequence at the end feeling somewhat self-reflexive in the way it suggests Frances (or Gerwig) has turned her own failures into self-expression through art. Never thought I'd be so wowed by Baumbach's technique here, but something about the way he melds the aesthetics of an old-fashioned, romanticised New York (in the same way Truffaut captures Paris in his early work) with his sensitive eye for composition was consistently inspired, drawing our attention to subtle details in performance through his deliberate but unobtrusive framing. Also found this to be extremely well structured, the film resembling a collection of low-key interactions which feel simultaneously self-contained yet inextricably connected in the way they inform our protagonist's development. A film truly of youth, one which seems to capture all the fleeting beauty of its many freedoms, but also all the stifling insecurities that arise from the uncertainty and instability this freedom can create.

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