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  • Godzilla: King of the Monsters

    Godzilla: King of the Monsters

    ★★★½

    I was pleasantly surprised by the newest over-CG'd, mass-destruction kaiju offering.

    Even hating CGI I thought the monsters were outstanding, including my chonk Godzilla boy. The extra poundage does him good. They all looked genuinely textured and moved like actual animals even if the director obfuscates them a bit too much sometimes with weather/smoke/fire much like he did in Krampus. The filmmakers nailed every single monster reveal, and there are a lot of them, as if they are their own…

  • Rocketman

    Rocketman

    ★★½

    Elton John purposefully walks into a counselling session. "You're gonna have to give him a moment, son. Elton John has to think about his entire life before he plays."

    I'm not sure when the rest of Hollywood will get around to seeing Walk Hard but when they do, they'll be quite embarrassed. That biopic formula should have been killed off when Dewey Cox hit the screen in 2007.

    The vaunted musical numbers are the high points of Rocketman, although a…

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  • The Dead Don't Die

    The Dead Don't Die

    ★★½

    The latest Jim Jarmusch picture, obviously marketed falsely as a Zombieland-esque wall-to-wall laughs and violence 'Zom-Com', lacks the usual upbeat energy of that niche genre. Instead, The Dead Don't Die is a curiously quirky but still fairly by-the-numbers zombie movie with a heavy-handed message that is clumsily presented; unusual for Jarmusch.

    That isn't to say there aren't funny moments. Bill Murray and Adam Driver have some great scenes together full of dry wit, assuming you don't get irritated by the…

  • The Killing of a Sacred Deer

    The Killing of a Sacred Deer

    ★★★★½

    "The feel good movie of the year."

    While Sacred Deer feels similar in ways to Lanthimos' previous works, instead of pulling at your heart strings in his own weird way like he did in The Lobster, this is a Kubrickian nightmare wrapped around a Greek tragedy. His usual mechanisms are still at play: the deadpan wooden dialogue, the absurdist "comedy", excessive sharing of personal information. But this time, they are used to set up a surrealist horror experience flaying the…