• Flee

    Flee

    ★★★★½

    Jonas Poher Rasmussen’s animated documentary provides necessary insight into the life of a refugee.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • Cry Macho

    Cry Macho

    ★★★½

    Clint Eastwood acts his age in this sweet, quiet western.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • Two-Lane Blacktop

    Two-Lane Blacktop

    ★★★½

    Trying to imagine someone sitting down for this film, and thinking it's about a cross-country race only to discover it's about alienation, loneliness, and the small moments of connection with other people that we treasure. Once you get on the film's wavelength, it's pretty lovely even if it can also be incredibly sad and longing. While I certainly didn't care for Kent Jones' essay (Never insult The Graduate to me!), I at least like the light it sheds on the film and helped me to better understand what Hellman was going for here.

  • Jagged

    Jagged

    ★★½

    Alison Klayman’s documentary dives into Morissette’s background only to devolve into a simple celebration of her groundbreaking album.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • Queenpins

    Queenpins

    ★★

    Aaron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly’s movie has such a light touch that it fails to make much of an impact.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • The Wheel

    The Wheel

    ★★★★

    With four terrific lead performances at its center, ‘The Wheel’ examines the limits of love.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • The Eyes of Tammy Faye

    The Eyes of Tammy Faye

    ★★★½

    Michael Showalter's film examines the intersection of entertainment and Christianity.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • You Are Not My Mother

    You Are Not My Mother

    ★★★½

    Dolan makes a promising and unnerving feature debut with a powerful metaphor about a parent beyond understanding.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • This Is Not a Film

    This Is Not a Film

    ★★★★

    A really insightful look at the creative impulse under restrictive conditions. I also like how it blurs the lines between documentary and drama to the point where I was left wondering at the end if his handsome neighbor was truly his handsome neighbor or an actor to make the point about where the lines of filmmaking and documenting begin and end. It's an incredibly fascinating work that made me want to see more of Panahi's filmography.

  • Malignant

    Malignant

    ★★★★

    James Wan’s latest film takes increasingly bigger swings and delights in its own madcap exuberance.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.

  • The Piano

    The Piano

    ★★★★½

    Loved this. It's a masterclass in symbolism coupled with terrific performances and stunning visuals. I can only imagine how Film Twitter would have reacted to it if it had been around at the time of its release because it's not an easy film, especially where concepts of consent are considered. But the whole film is about communication from the start and whether true communication is even possible if you can't know another person's thoughts and hearts. Does everything get lost…

  • River

    River

    ★★★★½

    Much like her subject matter, Jennifer Peedom’s film is capable of both tranquility and devastating power.

    Click over to Collider for the full review.