Morris Yang

Morris Yang

Pro

Without my cookies, I’m just a monster.

Favorite films

  • Hiroshima Mon Amour
  • Breaking the Waves
  • Holy Motors
  • Werckmeister Harmonies

Recent activity

All
  • The Year of the Everlasting Storm

    ★★½

  • Ahed's Knee

    ★★★

  • Annette

    ★★★½

  • Reflection

    ★★★½

Pinned reviews

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  • In Front of Your Face

    In Front of Your Face

    ★★★★

    My dispatch for In Review Online:

    The films of Hong Sang-soo, ever so magical yet construed from the affairs of quotidian encounters, every minimal gesture compounding a maximal observation, have over the past two decades established through their associative textures a cinematic canon of sorts; a canon whose shared DNA translates, transmutes, and transcribes between iterations its theses and truths on human existence, equally specific to its social backdrop of contemporary Korea as it speaks to the insights of the…

  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    ★★★★★

    There’s nothing quite like this one. Kaufman at his most unrestrained, unconscious, unsettling: a Lynchian tapestry of all the unease that comes with existing, alone or with another — or both at once. The recesses go deeper, time seems to distillate into a synchronic eternal, compartments unfold and box themselves into storage spaces in the mental warehouses and psychological manifolds of an always-already societal symbiosis: of relationships, interactions, hierarchies, memories, co-habitating spaces and minutes. I’m Thinking of Ending Things synthesises…

Recent reviews

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  • The Year of the Everlasting Storm

    The Year of the Everlasting Storm

    ★★½

    Overall, an eclectic mix of tone and mood, each varying in scope and competence, fluctuating between restrained lyricism and bandwagon camp. A rough ranking of the segments: Weerasethakul > Vitthal > Panahi > Sotomayor > Poitras > Lowery > Chen.

  • Ahed's Knee

    Ahed's Knee

    ★★★

    I guess this already works if you have a strong reaction towards it, love it or hate it. Self-criticism and self-aggrandisement overlap frequently in this visceral, brutal, damning autofiction that’s also an indictment of political paralysis, cowardly hyper-masculinity, and unthinking nationalism; the commentary and angles thrown out here are virtually endless, but also indicative of a creative rut being forcefully broken, to better and worse results.

Popular reviews

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  • Bergman Island

    Bergman Island

    ★★★★

    The quintessential Swedish film: Bergman, saunas, ABBA.

  • Two/One

    Two/One

    ★★★

    The last act, which literalises the film's underlying conceit, also unravels its philosophical and existential heft; logical and narrative absurdity abounds. Yet on the whole, Cabral's debut is remarkably attuned to the sensibilities of the modern world, portraying a globalised and — dare I say — universal consciousness within each and every one of us, as we contend with our place in this vast and alienating society. There are some impressive shots and sequences in this one.