Favorite films

  • The Long Day Closes
  • Two Lovers
  • Shame
  • Trouble Every Day

Recent activity

All
  • She Said

    ★★★

  • BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths

    ★★★½

  • All Quiet on the Western Front

    ★★½

  • Athena

    ★★½

Recent reviews

More
  • BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths

    BARDO, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths

    ★★★½

    The *most* film of the year, that’s for sure. Picture Sorrentino directing Synecdoche, Mexico City… written by, well, Inarritu.

    What really does work — in addition to the always-welcome setting-as-character cinematic excursion to Mexico — is the virtuoso camerawork. Bardo, at times, feels almost like a surreal video game, and may very well be the most immersive film since Gangs Of New York — Khondji legitimately out-Lubezki’ed Lubezki’s patented wide-angle tracking shots. Some truly jaw-dropping, scene-of-the-year-contending sequences, eventually and unfortunately undone by repetitious, bombastic maximalism…

  • TÁR

    TÁR

    ★★★★

    The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good.”
    — Samuel Johnson

    You think it’s on the nose; not so fast. You think it’s pretentious; it’s actually very well-versed but playfully humorous and even straight up savage. You think it’s nihilistic; it’s actually judicatory. You think Tár will be the mouthpiece for Field’s criticisms of the contemporary public panopticon; she isn’t. You think it might lean toward abstraction, opaqueness or inscrutability;…

Popular reviews

More
  • Compartment No. 6

    Compartment No. 6

    ★★★½

    Unromanticized, but so romantic. No greater destination than connection.

    Two beautiful, lonely performances. Odd couple chemistry for the books. 

    Imperfect and low key, but a bit of a kid sibling to Lost In Translation, In The Mood For Love, and Before Sunrise. 

    The warmest winter.

  • Burning

    Burning

    ★★★★★

    I don't believe I've ever seen a film that's equally cruel as it is empathetic to its characters. Watching these identities unfold -- or not -- becomes, stealthily, an almost unbearably draining, unsettling experience. The interplay of gender and class with paranoia and vulnerability here is something of an unprecedented chemical reaction; a serene, realistic waking nightmare.

    Imagine having this much confidence in your storytelling, pacing, form, and ambiguity... BURNING is essentially the cinematic equivalent of negative space; SCHRODINGER'S CAT:…