Favorite films

  • Everything Everywhere All at Once
  • Eternity and a Day
  • The Worst Person in the World
  • Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

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  • The Gift

    ★★★

  • Memoria

    ★★★★

  • Days of Being Wild

    ★★★★

  • For Love of the Game

    ★★½

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  • The Gift

    The Gift

    ★★★

    Blank Check podcast watch along:
    Sam Raimi

    An impressive collection of talent involved in this one between Cate Blanchett, Keanu Reeves, JK Simmons, a Billy Bob Thornton script, and of course Raimi behind the camera. Unfortunately it's pretty uneven and fails to deliver on what should be reliable strengths of its genre. You could describe it as a supernatural murder investigation but that's putting it in a more exciting box than it really belongs in. Blanchett is our lead and…

  • Memoria

    Memoria

    ★★★★

    I'll categorize this as one of Weerasethakul's most accessible since it joins Uncle Boonmee as the only two I have not dozed off during. Not that falling asleep is an issue when watching one of his films - what would normally be the highest insult is baked into the DNA of everything he's made. Something about that half-awake state of consciousness makes you more receptive to the rhythm of lengthy static shots and the dreamy approach to magical realism. This…

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  • Satantango

    Satantango

    ★★★★★

    Thanks to Criterion Channel (and Arbelos for the wonderful restoration) I have finally tackled a "white whale" of world cinema: Hungarian auteur Béla Tarr's seven and a half hour slow cinema masterpiece Sátántangó. It is a film that demands your complete focus and that you don't think about focusing, not necessarily an easy place to get. If you can get yourself in that mindset and stay there it is capable of inducing a cinematic trance unlike anything I've experienced.

    Tarr…

  • Days of Being Wild

    Days of Being Wild

    ★★★★

    Kind of a more restrained and less quirky trial run for Chungking Express. It centers around a womanizer and his two most recent relationships, each of them tossed to the side as soon as a real commitment looms. They in turn have would-be romances with two characters loosely connected to the womanizer. The result is a dance of rotating partners without a resolution, tapping into that unfulfilled longing for connection that Wong depicts so vividly. The less showy editing really gives Christopher Doyle's cinematography and the collection of performances a chance to shine.