Liam Sullivan

Dad, archivist, and film buff attempting to watch the best movies ever made.

Favorite films

  • The City of Lost Children
  • Do the Right Thing
  • Genghis Blues
  • The Muppet Movie

Recent activity

All
  • Lightyear

    ★★★

  • The Second Mother

    ★★★½

  • The Sea Beast

    ★★★½

  • Ms. Marvel

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • The Sea Beast

    The Sea Beast

    ★★★½

    "But you can be a hero and still be wrong."

    In a world where the oceans are filled with giant sea monsters, the heroes of the age are The Hunters.  Salty crews of sailors on ships like The Inevitable under Captain James Crow (Jared Harris) and his adopted son Jacob Holland (Karl Urban) hunt down and kill sea monsters for rewards from the King and Queen of Three Bridges.  An orphan Maisie Brumble (Zaris-Angel Hator) stow away on The Inevitable

  • Winged Migration

    Winged Migration

    ★★★★½

    Filmed on all seven continents over several years, this documentary captures the wonder of several species of birds carrying out their annual migrations.  Cameras mounted on ultralight planes and other devices make it feel as if you're flying with the flock.  Minimal narration from Jacques Perrin provides context, but by and large this movie is the majesty and wonder of the birds.

Popular reviews

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  • The Hotel New Hampshire

    The Hotel New Hampshire

    ★★★

    Sorrow floats, too.

    When I was in my early teens my mom told my sister and I about this weird movie she saw on tv about this eccentric family who have a flatulent dog named Sorrow who dies and then keeps popping up in taxidermied form. Eventually we watched it together and it turned out to be even weirder than imagined. In retrospect it's strange that I watched this movie at such a young age.  You could put content warnings…

  • Hiroshima Mon Amour

    Hiroshima Mon Amour

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Along with The 400 Blows and Breathless, this movie kickstarted the French New Wave.  Director Alain Resnais previously made the Holocaust documentary Night and Fog, and this movie similarly pulls no punches in using archival footage depicting the horrors of the atomic bomb detonation in Hiroshima.  The better part of the movie though focuses on a non-linear conversation between French Actress Elle (Emmanuelle Riva) and Japanese architect Lui (Eiji Okada) as the have a brief and passionate affair.  Note that…