Peter Foy

Avid reader and movie buff, constantly in need to engage his already massive pop-culture lexicon.

Favorite films

  • The Master
  • A History of Violence
  • Walkabout
  • Blue Velvet

Recent activity

All
  • Last Night at the Alamo

    ★★★★

  • Rapture

    ★★★★½

  • Eight Hours Don't Make a Day

    ★★★★½

  • Crimes of the Future

    ★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Last Night at the Alamo

    Last Night at the Alamo

    ★★★★

    Eagle Pennel's high-spirited chamber piece is a successful diatribe on both southern masculinity and Reaganism, and may even have you re-examine the dynamics next time you go to your local neighborhood bar.

  • Rapture

    Rapture

    ★★★★½

    An often fascinating meta-film that's both a commentary of the hallucinatory potency in film, as well as a harrowing portrait of addiction. Focusing on a drug-addicted filmmaker and his retrieval of a film from an acquaintance, the film essentially overlaps two narratives between the two characters and in a format that is both non-linear and possibly told from an unreliable narrator. The film's two hours gives viewers a barrage of images that range from beautiful to hideous, but it always…

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  • Peterloo

    Peterloo

    ★★★★

    The latest from Mike Leigh is another period piece that's sturdy in its familiar arc, while undoubtedly enhanced by its director's singular prowess as well. Detailing one of England's most infamous massacres, Peterloo takes its time getting to the climactic carnage (as one would hope and expect), but it's most effective in how it examines both sides of the conflict. The aristocracy and rebellious working class of 19th century England are giving about equal screen-time here, and the extensive dialogue…

  • I Love You, I Don't

    I Love You, I Don't

    ★★★★½

    Serge Gainsbourg's unorthodox love story is a raw film, that's also impeccably well made and often beautiful. While its story of a gay man forming a sexual tryst with a slightly androgynous woman (the latter played by Gainsbourg's lover, Jane Birkin) is mildly absurd, it uses this framework to look at areas like sexual prejudice, misogyny, and homophobia. Gainsbourg really presented himself an auteur right out the gate with this first directorial effort, as its mounted with a plethora of…