Reel Steel

Reel Steel

Film Magazine ¦ Screening Events.

Film Reviews - Cult Movie Features - Film Screenings.

Favorite films

  • The Way of the Dragon
  • The Thing
  • Drive
  • Akira

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  • Dragon Fist

    ★★★★½

  • Eraserhead

    ★★★★★

  • Videodrome

  • Seven Samurai

    ★★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Dragon Fist

    Dragon Fist

    ★★★★½

    This is - and possibly surprising given it was so early in his career - one of Jackie Chan's all-time best films.
    Directed by Lo Wei (director of Bruce Lee's The Big Boss, and Fist of Fury), the story is essentially Bruce Lee's Fist of Fury (and quite typical of kung fu films of the time) - the death of a master, seeking revenge - but with a twist, and set in a different time period.

    The film was made…

  • Eraserhead

    Eraserhead

    ★★★★★

    “Some inane, bizarre person with a disturbed mind wrote that film and I did not enjoy it.”

    This is an example of one audience reaction to a screening of Eraserhead in New York’s Greenwich Village, in 1977.

    The film’s journey to the monolithic cult status it holds now began there as a midnight feature, a route shared by underground classics such as John Waters’ Pink Flamingos (1972) and George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead (1968). Though Eraserhead seemed…

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  • Videodrome

    Videodrome

    Throughout the 1980s, David Cronenberg had one of the best directorial runs in science-fiction horror cinema.
    40 years on from the initial release, Videodrome is seen as one of the most prescient and influential movies of all time.

    The story follows Max Renn, an executive of a television network on the lookout for extreme new content. When Max is introduced to a pirate signal broadcast known as ‘Videodrome’, he searches for the source in hope of acquiring it for his…

  • Saint Maud

    Saint Maud

    ★★★★★

    It takes a very rare beast of a directorial debut to make you wince, laugh and question the capacity of the human mind in less than 90 minutes.
    Rose Glass’s Saint Maud, a sinuous saga of madness and torment respects the many religion-inspired films in the horror genre, but suggests a surprising range of stylistic and narrative inspirations, from Lynn Ramsay’s grit to Edward Hopper’s loners in diners.

    Maud (Morfydd Clark) is a palliative nurse in a dilapidated seaside town…

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