Carol

Carol

If i had to pick one film that perfectly encapsulates Tarkosvsky's "poetic cinema" meme, my choice would be Carol. The film has one of the most potent portrayals of love and loss i've ever witnessed on film but it's handle on desire remains almost unmatched by any picture i've seen thus far. Calling it desire might actually be an understatement. The way in which Therese gazes upon Carol, it exceeds desire or lust. I would say the word but the diction is not in my vocabulary. A story about two women, detached from the men in their respective lives, who instead find each other is all too familiar but Haynes' tenderness and overall charm are in full effect here, giving the film its distinctive flavour. It's the little details and moments that are important. Every gesture, every glance between the two women. The glimpses and little objects that are potent symbols of their love. These small but significant moments are seminal in building towards the perfect moment of intimacy in the film. The words "take me to bed" have never sounded so succulent. A perfect culmination of all the eye-fucking that has been happening up to that point in the film. I couldn't hide my disappointment even if i wanted to every time a man appeared on the screen. The men are completely insufferable in this film, a conscious choice by director Haynes to emphasize just how much these women really need each other. They need to support and protect each other from the harsh realities of society. And they can, because after all, there's nothing more powerful than two women in love

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