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  • One Deadly Summer

    One Deadly Summer

    ★★★½

    There is a sweltering heat, shimmering sweat, at the very opening of L’été meurtrier (One Deadly Summer), when Elle steps into the frame. “That girl” quickly becomes the talk of the southern French town, and claims the leering eyes of most of the men. Much of what makes Isabelle Adjani smoking hot here, is what turns into an ever-evolving, multi-layered masterful display of acting. Adjani was the French star of the 1980s for sure.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/isabelle-adjani-one-deadly-summer/

  • Pauline at the Beach

    Pauline at the Beach

    ★★★★½

    In the end, the whole shenanigans prove to be an invigorating delight for its audience. The intertwined love / romance / attraction, whether simple or complex, is thrown around, just like in real life don’t you forget. And the candid discussions or mellow interrogation cause many a troubled human heart or even the occasional faux pas. The rolling flow of conversations, often in depth and frank, are not hard to follow. They are relatable too, to many of us, on…

  • Babel

    Babel

    ★★★★½

    Four compelling narratives are somehow linked, yet drift magnetically down their own unknown paths. Like 21 Grams, though certainly not as head-spinning, the timelines are even off-center in places. But never do we feel as lost and isolated as those souls depicted on film. It’s a remarkable piece of film work and story-telling, one which continued to prove Iñárritu’s innate talent for thought-provoking, powerful movie-making.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-babel-2006-72-days-to-go/

  • Capernaum

    Capernaum

    ★★★★★

    Capernaum is a astringently different beast in terms of tone and weight. Labaki has amped up the energy, the grit, the relevance, and the impact to the gut. There’s a deftly charm in Capernaum, though. Not a jolly affair, for sure, but the resilient, heavy drama taps into the love for life and the ambitious nature of humans – in this case, children.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-capharnaum-capernaum-2018-69-days-to-go/

  • The Collector

    The Collector

    ★★★★★

    William Wyler, a superbly established filmmaker with a million Oscar nods under his belt, adds another unique directorial execution bullet to his belt. The maker of films like Roman Holiday, Mrs. Miniver, and Ben Hur, has crafted an utterly engaging, brilliant suspense drama with The Collector. The dynamics between the two characters and their surroundings is flawless – there is not a segment out of place here.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-the-collector-1965/

  • The Incident

    The Incident

    ★★★★

    The plot then leaves Joe and Artie for a large chunk of the picture. The seeds of such behaviour have been sewn. What follows is carefully crafted foray into the group of characters. All travelling from various corners of New York City, to all eventually end up on the same Subway train.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/rewind-1967-in-film-the-incident/

  • Cléo from 5 to 7

    Cléo from 5 to 7

    ★★★★★

    Cléo from 5 to 7 is a feature film to stand proudly alongside the likes of Breathless or The 400 Blows. Varda was so engaged with her inspiring camera techniques, the varied means of shooting the central character of Cléo provided real substance to the heroine’s jumbled mindset. From afar, close-up, through mirrors, cracked glass – Varda achieved a mixture of points of view through her visual flair.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/the-essential-cinema-that-is-agnes-vardas-cleo-from-5-to-7/

  • Accident

    Accident

    ★★★★½

    The beautifully-observed Accident, opens with a car crash. But we don’t see it. Our frame is dominated by the countryside estate house, and the sounds of the speeding car approaching, then clunking off the road. It is both a picturesque, and alarming opening moment. A clear sign of the seemingly idyllic way of life intercepted with a languid, ebbing series of events.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-accident-1967/

  • Marketa Lazarová

    Marketa Lazarová

    ★★★★★

    Marketa Lazarová is a haunting, atmospheric film, often inviting you into the alluring, but aggrieved, space, and then closing in on you with a unflinching hypnosis. Every single frame delivers a message, an emotion, knocks you back, or draws you in. You feel the enticing gaze of the female form. The film captures fear in men’s glazed eyes. The surreal, unfamiliar elements are fitting to the film’s multi-faceted landscape. The sinister foolery of the wolf-eared hood, or the sympathetic oddity of a monk watching his beloved sheep head roll down a hillside.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/rewind-1967-in-film-marketa-lazarova/

  • Never on Sunday

    Never on Sunday

    ★★★★

    Never on Sunday, an enlightening romantic comedy, sends out sparks of political and social to and fros. Dessin, as the stranger in a strange land, takes his character, Homer (of course), into the wilderness of the warm, fascinating Greek community. A devotion to their way of life is so intimate and true, from the love of the sea, to the comfort of the bustling tavernas.

    Read Full Review on Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-pote-tin-kyriaki-never-on-sunday-1960/

  • Dogtooth

    Dogtooth

    ★★★★★

    So important was the appearance and success of Dogtooth, Lanthimos was labeled a kind of movie pioneer. Bringing a relevant freshness to Greek films, heralded up there with the best works of Theodoros Angelopoulos. Comparisons to film-making greats like Luis Buñuel and Michael Haneke are extremely flattering too, but Lanthimos has since proved his vivid worth.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-kynodontas-dogtooth-2009/

  • Wild at Heart

    Wild at Heart

    ★★★★

    The absurd and the outrageous (you’ve seen David Lynch films before, right?) is splashed across the screen. The rocky road is littered with vivid lunatics and lost souls. They stop at a crash site, as a fatally wounded girl (Sherilyn Fenn) stumbles around for her purse. Marietta has big gun Marcello Santos (J.E. Freeman) to locate her daughter and dispose of Sailor. She also has a casual romance with private investigator Johnnie Farragut (Harry Dean Stanton), who ends up in the wrong hands of the eerily twisted Juana (Grace Zabriskie) and her henchmen.

    Read Full Review at Filmotomy: filmotomy.com/festival-de-cannes-72-countdown-wild-at-heart-1990/