• The Beguiled

    The Beguiled

    I never knew where The Beguiled was going. The conventions of film made me speculate, but my predictions were consistently wrong. Even if I came close to calling the movie early, writer/director Sofia Coppola deviated from the norm in a way that was immensely compelling. This isn’t to suggest that The Beguiled is full of shocking twists; it’s more abstract than that. What’s captivating about the film is how it flirts with convention, but choses to introduce more human, complex variables.

    Read the full review here: www.andsoitbeginsfilms.com/2017/06/the-beguiled.html

  • Whiplash

    Whiplash

    “There are no two words in the English language more harmful than Good Job.”

    These are words of discouragement from Terence Fletcher – renowned conductor, accomplished musician, teacher from Hell. By the time Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) utters this phrase in the thrilling new film, Whiplash, we have a full understanding of who he is: a maniacal tyrant who pushes his students at the Juilliard-like Shaffer Conservatory to the brink of emotional collapse. The harder, longer and louder he berates his…

  • Force Majeure

    Force Majeure

    The new Swedish film, Force Majeure, concerns itself with a fascinating concept known as fight or flight. That is to say, how do people respond to catastrophe? A question we love to debate over, but one that we never really know the answer to until we’re thrown into such a situation. We’re all guilty of sitting in the comfort of our air conditioned homes and yelling at the television when we see movie characters respond to situations in a way…

  • Interstellar

    Interstellar

    Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar opens in an undisclosed place at an undisclosed time in the future. And though the setting is opaque, the film makes it immediately clear that life on Earth is running out. Cities are unseen, populations are low, the military is nonexistent – all that remains is the need for steady farming, and the will to combat the dust that blankets every feasible area. The dust is so thick on Earth that a thin layer of it can…

  • Nightcrawler

    Nightcrawler

    The common maxim of news media dictates that if it bleeds, it leads. But Nightcrawler exposes the true horror of this statement, which is that if a white person bleeds (particularly at the hands of a minority), then the story really leads. And if the crime is committed in an affluent neighborhood, the story leads even stronger. That’s a terrifying reality of modern news culture. One that a struggling local news manager named Nina Romina (Rene Russo) impresses upon Lou.…

  • Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

    Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

    ★★★★★

    My love for Iñárritu’s latest film, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), took hold about 25 minutes into the film. That’s when I became acutely aware of what it was doing. The technique of the film has already been discussed endlessly, and that’s because there’s no way to avoid mentioning it. If you’ve managed to keep Birdman’s style hidden, then cease reading this review. Because here it is: the entirety of Birdman occurs in one unbroken shot. As lensed…

  • The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her

    The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her

    The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is about perspective. Perspective of the relationship that Connor (James McAvoy) has with his wife, Eleanor (Jessica Chastain). And perspective of the relationship that Eleanor has with her husband, Connor. If those perspectives sound like they belong in the same movie, writer/director Ned Benson has made it very clear that distinction between the two is key.

    My full review can be found here:
    www.andsoitbeginsfilms.com/2014/10/the-disappearance-of-eleanor-rigby.html

  • The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him

    The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him

    The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is about perspective. Perspective of the relationship that Connor (James McAvoy) has with his wife, Eleanor (Jessica Chastain). And perspective of the relationship that Eleanor has with her husband, Connor. If those perspectives sound like they belong in the same movie, writer/director Ned Benson has made it very clear that distinction between the two is key.

    My full review can be found here:
    www.andsoitbeginsfilms.com/2014/10/the-disappearance-of-eleanor-rigby.html

  • Gone Girl

    Gone Girl

    ★★★★★

    The girl is missing. So discovers Nick Dunne on the afternoon of July 5, when he walks inside his suburban, Midwestern home and notices that his wife, Amy, is nowhere to be found. A living room table rests flipped and smashed, but no other sign of struggle is apparent. The police arrive as quickly as they’re called. They notice things. A little blood splattered on the kitchen cabinet. An iron that’s still somewhat hot. Nick’s mostly blasé attitude. And so…

  • Night Moves

    Night Moves

    Do me a favor and think about a recent time you got together with a friend to hang out. Maybe you went to happy hour, maybe you had dinner; you’re meeting up with someone you likely meet up with often. You shoot the shit, tell jokes, share laughs. Now, think about what you really said to this person while you were with them. You’ve known them for a while, so there was probably no reason to, for example, keep repeating…

  • Coherence

    Coherence

    One of the easiest ways to make a movie for cheap is to set it in one interior location. But one of the hardest things about creating a cheap movie is to make it for cheap, but not cheap looking. The new micro budget headtrip, Coherence, accomplishes both feats. The entire film is set in (and directly around) one home, and takes place over one particularly troubling evening. Rather than let its minimalist setting work against it, Coherence embraces its own physical claustrophobia. It traps you in its unsettling atmosphere and dares you to pick it apart.

    My full review can be found here:
    www.andsoitbeginsfilms.com/2014/09/coherence.html

  • Coldwater

    Coldwater

    How do you raise a child who is behaving badly? A teenage boy who is violent at home and rebellious in the streets? Hundreds of films have been dedicated to answering this question. Some movie parents enforce strict rules to set their kid straight. Others mask their fear by giving in, being cool, letting shit slide. Many attempt to introduce a positive new variable, such as a competitive sport or a noble trade.

    The parents represented in the fantastic and…