Yi Yi ★★★★½

90/100

A delicately understated view of family life within a changing societal landscape and a beautiful snapshot of individual feelings and emotions; Yi Yi: A One and a Two is a monumental mess of people, places, ideas, sentiment, and interconnections. Edward Wang's film is splendidly gentle, caring and almost caressing every character as if life was their own silent guardian. The camera inaudibly observes and views these people with hushed wisdom and concrete consistency, even furthering the evidence that the camera itself wants to become one of the participants.

This is a nearly 3-hour film, and it does feel overly slow at points, but before you know it, these people have changed or shifted in utterly resplendent ways, and it's one of the only times that I wanted to go back and relive moments before the film was even over. Sometimes, carefully crafted characters, genuine feeling, and precise direction is all you need for a scrumptious viewing experience.