Matt Lockwood

Matt Lockwood

B.A. Cinema Studies - Oakland University

Favorite films

  • Rear Window
  • Solaris
  • House
  • The Red Shoes

Recent activity

All
  • Alleluia

  • Nine to Five

  • Girl Gang

    ★★

  • Night Shift

Recent reviews

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  • My Teacher's Wife

    My Teacher's Wife

    ★½

    Stayed for Tia Carrere and not much else. The most important lesson I learned is to never piss off Shooter McGavin.

  • Sunshine State

    Sunshine State

    ★★★

    Last year during one of The Criterion Collection/Barnes & Noble 50% off sale I was doing some extreme flirting with the idea of purchasing John Sayle's Matewan (1987) but decided not to do so. Now I'm regretting that choice. During the next sale that will be the first title in my cart.

    It is very evident that Sayle's work is heavily steeped in the philosophy of direct humanism - perhaps even in the school of Steinbeckian approach and practice. Sunshine State…

Popular reviews

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  • Crystal Swan

    Crystal Swan

    ★★★★★

    The third act really plunges into a well of nihilism through a metaphorical scene that perhaps signifies antiquated rules of law and culture that are forced upon the nonconformists of society. Stepan, a military bootlicker and yes man, fails at making Velya, a freedom and liberation seeker, crumble under the soul crushing traditions of the Soviet Union in a post-Soviet world. While the end of the film is left to personal interpretation, the shouts of "Freedom!" from protesters as the…

  • The Portuguese Woman

    The Portuguese Woman

    ★★★★★

    Minimal, defeatist slow-burn cinema reminiscent of Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972) and Lucrecia Martel’s La Ciénaga (2001). The camera rigorously stages both static and moving imagery within the backdrops of vibrant and confined frames-within-frames spaces of immense narrative structure. Life is portrayed as a dry existence within a commentary of power, religion, war, and gender that ultimately delves into a beautiful realm of fatalism. Gomes successfully opens a window of contemplation into a vast text of self-identity.