Stephen Furda

I should be more popular on here.

Favorite films

  • The Smiling Lieutenant
  • The Patsy
  • The Aviator's Wife
  • King of New York

Recent activity

All
  • This Gun for Hire

    ★★★½

  • Wild Girl

    ★★★★

  • Miami Blues

    ★★★★½

  • The Horn Blows at Midnight

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • This Gun for Hire

    This Gun for Hire

    ★★★½

    Alan Ladd's character is a surprisingly nasty anti-hero, especially given that all I know of Ladd is his good boy Shane persona, and the film does a good job of celebrating and condemning him in equal measure. Frank Tuttle maybe isn't a great crime drama director - doesn't help that I associate him with the frothy Bing Crosby comedies of the 1930s - but the film is stylish enough and I liked the on-location photography in the final set piece.

  • Wild Girl

    Wild Girl

    ★★★★

    Raoul Walsh is maybe more at home with the urban bonhomie of Me and My Gal, but this, his other 1932 collaboration with Joan Bennett, has a lot of the same lovely freewheeling energy applied to a portrait of life on the frontier. The cast is mostly wonderful - only Charles Farrell doesn't quite fit into the patchwork, but Joan Bennett is very compelling alongside personalities like Ralph Bellamy and Eugene Pallette - Walsh's mastery of tone, the shifts from pre-code naughtiness to bleak drama, is impressive. Also loved the weird storybook touches - the post-credit character introductions, the episodic storytelling style, the page-flipping transitions.

Popular reviews

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  • When the Cat Comes

    When the Cat Comes

    ★★★★

    Released early in the development of the Czechoslovak New Wave, it’s fun and fitting to think of The Cassandra Cat as a metaphor for the cinema movement and its place in the strict communist regime of Czechoslovakia. The titular cat removes his glasses and shows the people of the town their true colors. This, too, is what the Czech New Wave filmmakers set out to dd, often to the dismay of their country’s censors who, like many of the townspeople…

  • Fahrenhype 9/11

    Fahrenhype 9/11

    ½

    This semester, I took a class on post-9/11 media. Collectively, we felt that it would be interesting to watch a conservative documentary to see what kind of tactics were used in comparison to the liberal documentaries we had already watched over the semester. I guess this was the only one available in the library, so there you go. Conveniently, it positions itself as a response to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11, one of the first films we watched this semester. I…