Favorite films

  • Harold and Maude
  • A Night at the Opera
  • From Beyond
  • Little Shop of Horrors

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  • David

    ★★★★

  • The Altar of Lust

    ★★★★★

  • Lydia Lunch: The War Is Never Over

    ★★★½

  • The Unsuspected

    ★★★

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  • David

    David

    ★★★★

    Zach Woods, a man who understands the nuances of masculinity in its many forms, steps behind the camera for his directorial debut, David. It's a short film that combines the sometimes difficult dynamics of therapist-patient and father-son, as well as white privilege juxtaposed with a Black man who ends up in a kind of caregiver/comforter role (maybe not really explored in depth, but I did wonder about the extent to which Woods wanted to involve it). Oh, and it's about…

  • The Altar of Lust

    The Altar of Lust

    ★★★★★

    "Remember, Viveca, I'm doing this for you. Just consider yourself my patient and leave everything in my hands. I think by having sex with me, I can shock you out of your lesbian tendencies. I often do this with some of my female patients. And it really works quite well! I'm not going to hurt you, don't worry..."

    Oh, Roberta Findlay, you one-of-a-kind nut.

    In December 1971, the esteemed cinematic maverick and supposed anti-feminist came out swinging with her solo…

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  • To Live and Die in L.A.

    To Live and Die in L.A.

    ★★★★★

    "Buddy, you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time."

    Forget The French Connection. Forget The Exorcist. Forget Cruising. Maybe don't forget The Boys in the Band and Sorcerer (I haven't seen them yet). But the point is: William Friedkin's ultimate masterpiece of storytelling is To Live and Die in L.A.

    As Noirvember comes to a close, I knew I had to revisit this nasty gem of neo-noir darkness. Everything is iconic: Robby Müller's cinematography, M. Scott Smith's editing, the…

  • Lady on a Train

    Lady on a Train

    ★★★★

    To mark the hundredth anniversary of Deanna Durbin's birth, I return to a film that I watched endlessly on VHS throughout my childhood, Lady on a Train, a good print of which is available for free on YouTube. It's the most confounding mixture of whodunit and wacky comedy, the kind that probably shouldn't work nearly as well as it does but which endears itself to me every time.

    Based on a story by The Saint author Leslie Charteris and the…