Favorite films

  • Mulholland Drive
  • Vertigo
  • Singin' in the Rain
  • Taxi Driver

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  • Malignant

    ★★★½

  • Pig

    ★★½

  • Candyman

    ★★

  • Reminiscence

    ★★

Recent reviews

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  • Malignant

    Malignant

    ★★★½

    I must admit, despite his undisputed status as the most influential horror director of the past decade alongside Mike Flanagan, I have found James Wan's output until now to be a series of respectable semi-failures interrupted by the odd complete success. For all his visual inventiveness and the contagious pleasure he takes in filming, Wan has rarely managed to carry out his ambitious ideas beyond the immediate confines of a single scene or sequence. Worse, after inaugurating the Conjuring franchise…

  • Pig

    Pig

    ★★½

    Constructed like a John Wick-style revenge thriller with the quiet pace of a Kelly Reichardt drama, Michael Sarnoski's feature début assembles all the ingredients Internet culture has come to expect from Nicolas Cage films - an eccentric loner protagonist with a secret past, a strange underground subculture hiding in plain sight, a scenario in which the hero is wronged by nebulous forces - and proceeds to upend those expectations bit by bit. There's hardly any violence, and what little there…

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  • Sound of Metal

    Sound of Metal

    ★★★½

    Sound Of Metal is a film divided into two subjects, each one expressed by different aspects of its production. The first and most obvious is deafness, specifically the physical and psychological effect of progressively losing a whole part of your world that you've staked so much of your existence on. The second, less overt but arguably even more central, is addiction; not just to a particular substance, although heroin is namechecked, but rather as a general personality disorder that hooks…

  • Munyurangabo

    Munyurangabo

    ★★★½

    A calm, distant observation of human reconnections and disconnections in the course of a long, yet uncommonly small-scaled journey for catharsis. Lee Isaac Chung captures the unvoiced discomforts and subtle shifts in his characters' states of mind in long, still shots that make you feel every awkward second like drips from a tap, filming time like a cool, still river of silence. Through the prolonged stay at Swanga's family home in which Ngabo's presence as a Tutsi slowly brings repressed…