• The Red Balloon

    The Red Balloon

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers.

    Innocence is a red balloon gliding through the bustling streets of Paris. Everyone in the city has it, but not everyone tries to protect it. It was discovered dangling in a light post by a young boy as he walked alone on his way to school, and out of wonder and a need for company, untied the string off the pole and carried it along. He was a freewheeling juvenile and the balloon went wherever…

  • The Black Phone

    The Black Phone

    ★★★

    Of the vast collection of horror media I was exposed to as a child, Scott Derrickson’s Sinister was among the most memorable (partly because it served as my introduction to Ethan Hawke) ang genuinely frightening. Ten years after its release, he returned with the same actor and a new vision but a different energy and one that tried to appeal to the mainstream’s preferred aesthetic of the genre more than the aforementioned work which maintained an indie sensibility, or a…

  • No Half Measures: Creating the Final Season of Breaking Bad

    No Half Measures: Creating the Final Season of Breaking Bad

    ★★★★½

    Six months have gone by since I sat through an episode of Breaking Bad and this series that Vince Gilligan leisurely cooked to perfection continues to find a way to lure me in its immersive universe. The number of times I came back to the ending of “Crawl Space” (S4E11) just to study the minute details of Bryan Cranston’s facial expressions, visited Reddit posts to understand some things better, or listened to Dave Porter’s musical themes are too many to…

  • Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

    Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

    ★★★★

    The darkness residing within the core of Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia is the same deep, apocalyptic spirit that I encountered with a handful of different films in the past whose creators lived tragic lives but nonetheless remained somewhat hopeful or rebellious through artistic means–I’ve always had this assumption while basking in the gleaming ingenuity of Sam Peckinpah’s underseen gem made during the peak of American cinema and it turned out to be nothing short of accurate in…

  • Morbius

    Morbius

    ★★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers.

    There was before Morbius, and there was after Morbius. We never see films these days that completely eradicate our conceptions and pretensions about what cinema is and what it should be, yet somehow that is precisely what was accomplished here–the first since Andrei Tarkovsky broke new ground for the medium with Mirror in 1975 but has since then aged like milk. By breaking not only the line between hero and villain but the barrier which…

  • Dune

    Dune

    ★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers.

    What an interesting way to begin a new year. I surprised myself with this one, too. Quite objectively, Denis Villenueve beat David Lynch in nearly every department there is yet I cannot remove the awful aftertaste of that film. With the massive buzz surrounding the former’s screen adaptation of Frank Herbert’s famous novel last year, I knew that my eagerness must be kept on the highest level possible going in because I am not a…

  • Bad Company

    Bad Company

    Watch here: youtu.be/-9-DGieN8TY?t=00m00s

    So, here’s my short film and it’s called Bad Company. I could have released this a year ago but you all know the story by now. Although it is a simple work, the more we went deeper into production, the more I felt and appreciated the mysteries it had. During my writing process, not everything was planned or intentional and I think that is beautiful. It allowed me to perceive this world and the character from another…

  • Bad Company

    Bad Company

    Hello, Letterboxd friends! I will be keeping this message brief but first, I want to say thank you very, very much for the support that you have given me that kept the page somewhat alive because last year was not kind to me when talking about my life on this site. I had many plans that I was looking forward to seeing come into fruition but due to my horrible schedule, unfortunately, I was not able to log and especially…

  • Halloween Kills

    Halloween Kills

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers.

    Now that I finally got to see the twelfth installment in the Halloween franchise, David Gordon Green’s direct follow-up to his 2018 sequel, Halloween Kills, I can express my frustration with the direction the franchise is headed. It was not part of my Spooktober plan but my excitement beat me despite avoiding the sub-genre ever since I started broadening my horizons in film. I felt an immediate urge to write about it because I am…

  • The Fog

    The Fog

    ★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers.

    What a fortunate young man I am tonight. I got to accomplish a few academic tasks and just when I thought that I had no more chance in celebrating the season early properly, there was enough time left for me to watch John Carpenter’s film The Fog in beautiful remastered form by Studiocanal. It is by no means a masterpiece and nowhere near a great movie personally although I am genuinely overjoyed that it is…

  • Licorice Pizza

    Licorice Pizza

    Best Picture, please. Please!

  • Climax

    Climax

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers.

    Gaspar Noé is one of the filmmakers that are the easiest to avoid; his brash approach, his pretense, his preference for style over substance and the explicitness of his works are unrelenting, unforgiving and boastful. But similar to an equally notorious director (if not, worse), Lars von Trier, the power of their movies comes from the content. Yes, it may take no effort to dismiss them as pretentious, sleazeball “artists” solely depending on shock value…