William Ross

William Ross

Filmmaker. Cohost of Film Formally Podcast. Other things. Goes long on the musical scores.

Favorite films

  • PlayTime
  • It's Such a Beautiful Day
  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

Recent activity

All
  • Unbreakable

  • The Sixth Sense

  • Sweetgrass

  • Legally Blonde

Recent reviews

More
  • 8½

    Need to rewatch (again) in the next couple months. An overwhelming amount of stuff going on here. Mid-shot perspectival changes in the conference sequence are astonishing.

    New picture restoration is tremendous; audio doesn't seem to have been touched much from the earlier Janus digital version, which is fine since it sounds good, if not quite the best it's ever sounded.

  • Demon Slayer – Kimetsu no Yaiba – The Movie: Mugen Train

    Demon Slayer – Kimetsu no Yaiba – The Movie: Mugen Train

    Mugen Train has a lot of the same weaknesses as the first season of Demon Slayer: hit-and-miss humour and music, a lot of wonkiness and on-the-nose writing in its flashback structures, and a lack of depth or interrelated themes in its overall narrative. It's also distinctly a middle-chapter in a larger work; that's neither a good or bad thing, but for people who are used to franchise movies being "friendly to newcomers" it's worth emphasizing that this is not a…

Popular reviews

More
  • Army of the Dead

    Army of the Dead

    When a movie overwhelmingly uses shallow focus it loses opportunities for depth cues and complex geometry. When the lenses used go out of focus around the edges it loses opportunities for a focal point anywhere outside the center of the frame. When it uses a highly desaturated palette it loses opportunities for distinguishing objects via colour contrast. When it uses low contrast it loses further opportunities for distinguishing objects via luminance contrast. When it uses a lot of dynamic, semi-improvisational…

  • Still Processing

    Still Processing

    I find that when you can tell stories about the post-production phase of a movie (at least ones that aren't about resentment and recrimination), it's a good sign, because it means the film and its recorded material had vitality and potential that persisted well after the cameras were put away.

    On this one I felt totally harmonious with all its collaborators, their artistic strengths, their intents, and their logistical process. I have never met or even communicated with one of…